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Keogh vs. IRA: What’s the Difference?

Keogh vs. IRA: An Overview A Keogh plan (pronounced KEE-oh), or HR10, is an employer-funded, tax-deferred retirement plan designed for unincorporated businesses or self-employed persons. Contributions to it must come from net earnings from self-employment. The term itself is outdated. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) now calls them “qualified plans.” An individual retirement account (IRA), …

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Quickbooks vs. Quicken: Knowing the Difference

QuickBooks vs. Quicken: An Overview QuickBooks and Quicken are two of the most widely used financial management tools in the world. Both programs were part of Intuit (INTU), but Quicken was sold to H.I.G Capital in 2016. Both QuickBooks and Quicken have unique feature sets designed for different uses. Read on to find what each …

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401(k) and IRA Contributions: You Can Do Both

You can still contribute to a Roth IRA and/or traditional IRA even if you participate in a 401(k) plan at work—as long as you meet the IRA’s eligibility requirements. You might not be able to take a tax deduction for your traditional IRA contributions if you also have a 401(k), but that will not affect the amount you are …

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How to Become a Venture Capital Associate

Venture capital (VC) firms search the startup world and look for the next Meta (formerly Facebook) or YouTube. They provide risky capital infusions to early-stage or small companies that have limited access to more conventional sources of capital like bank loans. In exchange, the venture capitalists receive an ownership stake in the company and significant managerial oversight. In …

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Why Saving 10% Won’t Get You Through Retirement

Retirement experts and financial planners often tout the 10% rule: to live comfortably in retirement, you must save 10% of your income. The truth is that—unless you plan to go abroad after ceasing to work full-time—you will need a substantial nest egg. And saving 10% is probably not enough. Key Takeaways Saving only 10% of …

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